Bulletin#44

Dear Fellow Lunar Enthusiasts,

Can you ever have too much money? some might say, “Yes.” For instance consider the Giving Pledge. A group of people who perhaps realize that pleasure doesn’t come from amassing large amounts of cash. Which they have. So what do they do? They could cure malaria. A noble cause. But what would a few billion healthy people want? Would they want a future? Perhaps the Giving Pledge could enable a future as profound and expansive as a lunar habitation. That’s a goal that would put our specie’s future into a very favourable light. Money well spent on hope as well as health.

And the Google Lunar X Prize has moved its schedule to the right. Yes this is a common occurrence for many projects. But they seem to be the only group that’s bent on putting an entrepreneur onto the lunar surface. Let’s hope their schedule doesn’t slip further.

Our organization, the Lunar Colony Fund, continues to expound upon a future that includes humans traveling beyond Earth. Care to believe in this future? Care to help make it happen? Contact us and we can set a course together.


Mark Mortimer

President
Lunar Colony Fund

What can you imagine here?

AS17-145-22180
AS17-145-22180

Getting the Bucks for Buck Rogers!

Logbook #65

AS17-145-22180
AS17-145-22180

Le chapitre 65

“Close it,” Valentina angrily exhorted at Max.

He gave her a bemused shrug and kept brushing his teeth while the water poured out the tap.

“I’ve reminded you more than enough times that water is precious,” said Valentina, “and you need to treat it as even more valuable than any of those ridiculous golden earrings you wear.”

She wasn’t angry at Max in particular and they both knew it. It was her instincts that had been tuned for living on the Moon that had left her with a deep respect for the essentials that kept humans alive. She had quickly re-acclimatized to breathing Earth’s air and enjoying its quintessential varieties. But she hadn’t, and probably never would, resume her assumption that food and water were limitless. She flounced out of bed strode directly to the tap and closed the faucet in a manner that allowed for no reproach.

Max kept brushing his teeth without letting his facial expression change. He’d seen it before. He knew why Valentina was so emotional about water. But equally his time living a privileged life on Earth had inured him to both the absence of clean water and the continual demand for calories to power his body. He finished cleaning his teeth, washed up and approached Valentina who had changed into an appropriate suit ready for their day’s run at the Lunar Colony Fund’s board of directors.

“You do remember that I came to visit you on the Moon?” he reminded her.

“Yes I remember,” she said, “and I remember that there were no faucets, no waiters and no fresh produce there. We’ve got to take that knowledge and spread it to everyone on Earth. If people here were to exhibit a certain self-control it would go a long way toward improving everyone’s life.”

Max picked out his own power suit. He knew it was going to be a long day. They had to prioritize additions to the lunar facility versus maintaining the existing capabilities. He’d long ago given up wearing ties but he knew that the proper decorum could smooth the travel over many a disturbed waterway.

Valentina let out a sigh and apologized, “Sorry for being cranky. I can’t shake the need to conserve everything. And I don’t want to ever let that feeling go. On the Moon it was a necessary survival strategy and it would serve a similar purpose here on Earth.”

She wore a light weight polyester suit that bore more than a little resemblance to the clothing that she wore while on the Moon. She carefully attached the button that identified her as a previous occupant of the Moon. While very few people on Earth would give any consideration to the button, it held great sway within the Lunar Colony Fund organization. With her experience and Max’s power there was very little that could stop them from pushing their united agenda forward. Yet they both realized, as with any infrastructure development, that it wasn’t desire that made progress. It was funding. And they continually needed more.

“Have you got the charts and figures showing the revenues from our lunar operations?” asked Max.

“Copies on the drive and copies here on paper and on copies the cloud” replied Valentina.

Most of their work today was convincing the Board to allot a greater amount of funds for increasing capability rather than simply sustaining the existing set-up. There was a certain amount of risk in this as any new capability would come with its own sustainment cost. The result was an increased demand on the facility’s power, operations load and maintenance. However with the existing lunar operations generating more of its own power and with its ever-closing food and water cycle then opportunities did exist.

Max and Valentina disagreed on just which opportunity to exercise. Max wanted to expand their existing mining facilities. He also wanted to bore deeper into the Haven to get an appreciation of the chemical composition of the minerals there.

Valentina wanted to expand their territory. She worried about the facility at the lunar north pole. It could send automated rovers anywhere. Only by establishing a presence on the land would they be able to have any say in the rovers’ routes. And possible ingresses upon their established network of routes and pathways. Creating them had required a huge effort by the inhabitants and she didn’t want to see their work demolished by a rogue robot.

She thought “What could those robots establish? A human’s presence was at best a temporary, tenuous sojourn. What were the structures for?” Still no answer came to her.

They rode the elevator down to the lobby together in silence. Each still wanting their chosen opportunity to be selected. Each wanting to support the other. Each ready to support any other prescient option. Theirs was the future of the human race. They had to choose wisely.