Bulletin#8

Dear Fellow Lunar Enthusiasts,

What were we thinking? Could it be as simple as pouring a bucket of ice water on our heads and we could raise money? Seems like this idea has momentarily captured the imagination of this continent. Can getting to the Moon be as simple as coming up with an imagination-capturing idea. We bet it is. Send us your ideas. How about offering to post the photograph of anyone taking a selfie while the full Moon shines in the background. Can you think of something better? Let’s hear from you!

While we wait here on Earth, we can still keep acquainted with what’s happening about the Moon. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter keeps on scanning the lunar surface. While it does provide all sorts of great information, it still only teases us with what could be at our hands if we were actually there. Don’t you wish you could see the effects of solar storms upon the lunar soil?

Thanks for the continued support from everyone. Keep asking your friends and colleagues to join our fund by registering. We will keep on sending this monthly newsletter and anyone exciting updates. Of course, we encourage you to become a member and help start humankind’s progress into space.

Mark Mortimer
President
Lunar Colony Fund

What can you imagine here?

AS17-147-22505
AS17-147-22505

Getting the Bucks for Buck Rogers!

Logbook #15

AS15-90-12249
AS15-90-12249

Le chapitre 15

Xu hated being the shortest. It drove her slight inferiority complex into absurdities. Her she was on tip toes trying to look over Desai’s and Jean’s shoulders. Valentina was on the terminal station reading the chat interface from CapCom. Apparently, their transmission cost rate was increasing again and there were undertones of potential disruptions of service. None of them enjoyed being the dependent off spring on another world. And this highlighted their concern.

She drew in her breath, placed a hand gently on each of the guy’s shoulders and softly but firmly pushed them aside. Once they realized she was there, they quickly stepped apart. Both looking at her with slightly larger eyes.

She sighed. “Don’t worry.” she began “We have many friends across the globe including a few with private transmission networks. We will never be left out on our own. At least not yet.” she concluded.

She gestured around her at the Hab. It was a comfortable home but nowhere near self-sustaining for the four of them. They all knew the reserves of food and air gave them only so many weeks of survival. And the actual number was readily available for each to see on any monitor.

While Xu placated their worries as best she could, she couldn’t calm her own. They had 3 months before the next supply ship. On top of that, they were expected to show some amount of progress in obtaining oxygen and water from local sources. Having Valentina immobilized indoors was a benefit and strain. Remaining inside allowed Valentina to focus on learning from sources on Earth. However, it kept her away from their optimal site, a possible cold trap on the side and bottom of the crater rim they had settled upon. If they could find water and could excavate it, they might be a long way to being self-sustainable. If they didn’t, they’d find themselves dependent upon Earth, or another water source, forever. She didn’t like being dependent upon anything and this worried her.

Xu returned her focus to the screen. The same uncertainty pervaded the news from Earth. There was the continual strife over ever-more scarce resources. Thousands suffering from inadequate care. And environmental disasters moving even more thousands to distress. The peace and tranquility of their module felt like a calm life boat in some very turbulent times.

Logbook #14

AS15-90-12245
AS15-90-12245

Le chapitre 14

Jean couldn’t quite believe he was hopping about the Moon’s surface on his own. He wasn’t really alone as Woof rolled along on a parallel route. Of course the eyes in the sky, the orbiting situation assessment satellites (OBSAS) were also tracking his every move. Still, no other person was anywhere close. And, he could say that he was the first person to have ever walked here. It was a truly astounding, surreal sensation for him.

He had become the most adept of all of them in transiting over the surface. His laid back lifestyle and slow reactions wonderfully suited the lack of air pressure and much lesser gravity. To move, he firmly placed each foot, got his balance, judged his destination’s distance and let his legs propel him. He didn’t really think about the motion as a few weeks of activity on the surface had got him pretty accustomed. Now, rocks and outcropping a metre high did not even slow him down. He could also smoothly ascend and descend gentle gradients and he was trying steeper slopes though he was in no hurry to find his limits.

Today he and Woof were looking at a nearby crevasse. It had stopped Woof’s assaying and Valentina wanted to know if Jean could descend into the crevasse and get a cross sectional assessment of the rock structure. Being that the Hab was situated on a crater rim, the only real direction for them was down, but the colonists were approaching any elevation changes very warily. They wanted to be certain of not falling all the way down and also of being able to climb back out from any descent. They’d already stretched their safety margin with Valentina’s accident and Xu had forbidden any of them from taking optional risks until their next resupply vessel had safely delivered its cargo. Therefore, Jean’s first foray to the crevasse was to get a more accurate assessment of its shape; its width, depth and slope. He liked exploring, especially when he could do so at his own pace.

“Maybe this was how Christopher Columbus felt” he thought.

The edge of the crevasse neared. As always, he was a little unsure of the actual distance as almost nothing gave him perspective. Woof was rolling along a little ahead, as had been ordered by Xu. Woof’s transmitter gave a continual update on the ground’s slope and the distance to the apparent edge of the crevasse. For a robot, it seemed almost eager. Jean followed it, shuffling his feet through the dust. Bouncing toes off the occasional rock. The crevasse was just ahead.

Bulletin#7

Dear Fellow Lunar Enthusiasts,

To think that it was 45 years ago that humans first stepped onto the Moon’s surface. We’ve sent probes to visit so many other features of the solar system and even out past the heliopause. Yet, we’ve returned to complacently stare up at that night-time shining orb and wonder “Will we ever leave this cradle of humanity?” Surely we won’t leave all the fun to the robots. Let’s keep working to get people to be part of future as well.


We at the Lunar Colony Fund undertook a great outreach opportunity at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum. Through it, many more people have joined us to show their support for a space faring future for our species. We have quite a way to go to reach our goal for the first building block on the Moon but we are making steps to get there. Continue to show your support for our venture wherever you can. Don’t forget to keep up with the progress of our fictional colonists. And I look forward to your continued help in gathering support and signing new members.


Mark Mortimer
President
Lunar Colony Fund

What can you imagine here?

AS16-108-17677
AS16-108-17677

Getting the Bucks for Buck Rogers!